LAGRANGE — LaGrange County was awarded an infrastructure grant, the Indiana Finance Authority announced Tuesday.

Albion and Avilla both applied for the grants, but were not among the recipients.

LaGrange County put up $6.18 million of its own funds and will receive an additional $5 million from the state’s State Water Infrastructure grant program.

LaGrange County will use the money to extend the Howe sewer system west to hook up homes in the twin lakes area.

LaGrange County LCRUD is waiting to see if it qualified for an additional state grant of almost an equal amount which would allow it to start that project.

Avilla was eyeing upgrades to its wastewater treatment plant among other projects.

The Avilla Town Council on July 21 approved a technical measure to allow the town to apply for $1.7 million grant from the IFA to pay for the upgrade and for a water main project on Ley Street. The town would have been required to come up with money equal to the value of the grant.

On June 16, the council had OK’d Tanner Consulting’s proposal to provide engineering plans for improvements to its wastewater treatment plant to the tune of $187,000.

The plant has not seen any significant upgrades since its construction 20 years ago, according to town officials.

The council approved a technical measure to allow the town to apply for $1.7 million grant from the State Water Infrastructure Fund to pay for the upgrade and for a water main project on Ley Street. The town would be required to come up with money equal to the value of the grant.

On June 16, the council had OK’d Tanner Consulting’s proposal to provide engineering plans for improvements to its wastewater treatment plant to the tune of $187,000.

The plant has not seen any significant upgrades since its construction 20 years ago, according to town officials.

On July 13, the Albion Town Council formally applied for a grant from the State Water Infrastructure Fund to the tune of $832,000 to help fix its ongoing issue with too much ammonia being released from its sewer ponds.

Almost 500 applications were received, according to the IFA’s website, requesting more than $700 million in assistance. The IFA was only appropriated $50 million in this state fiscal year to fund the program.

The website said because of the overwhelming demand and large number of extremely important infrastructure projects presented, the IFA decided it will use every available state and federal dollar at its disposal to fund over $100 million in project costs, which includes over $50 million dollars in grant funding from the State Revolving Fund Loan Program.

According to the IFA, project funding was prioritized for communities with:

An estimated user rate above:

• $100.00 for wastewater only

• $70.00 for drinking water only

• $15.00 for stormwater only

• A low to moderate median household income

• A moderate to high level of co-funding, and

• Projects that address regional needs.

Patrick Redmond (predmond@kpcmedia.com) contributed to this report.

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